Speak Flowers To The World

How We Met Our Neighbour During COVID-19

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

The TV was switched on at 11 pm and continued all night long. The TV wasn’t in our apartment, but its repetitive nonsensical blah blah travelled from our neighbour into our bedroom. It felt like we were stuck in a real-life version of The Sims. When nothing had changed around 4 am, we drowsily flipped our position to distance our ears from the wall, promising our future selves to deal with the noise.

The following day, at exactly 11 pm the TV was switched on again. We hadn’t followed through on our promise to deal with last night’s noise, so it was partly angry, partly embarrassed glances we shared as we asked the rhetorical question; who watches TV in the middle of the night? Because we already knew the answer; our neighbour.

At 2 am it became too much. We were both tired and unable to sleep, so we started to knock on the wall. Maybe no one was at home? Maybe the ‘smart’ TV had switched itself on? Nothing seemed to happen when we knocked, so we knocked again, this time louder. And again. And then the wall responded with a very loud, very firm knock. There definitely was someone at home, and this someone had no intention of tuning down the TV.

By now we were angry and perplexed. I even went online to search for our neighbour’s phone number, but somehow we decided to forfeit. Still unable to sleep we moved our giant mattress to the living room, once again promising our future selves to deal with the noise. And the next day we actually did deal with the situation.

My first instinct was to give our neighbour an angry visit, but somehow it didn’t feel right. So instead we made our neighbour a care package consisting of our favourite candy, flowers, wine, and a note apologising that we had knocked on the wall before knocking on the door. Of course, the note also explained why we had knocked, that the late-night TV watching was disturbing our sleep.

We got the kindest care package in return, including a note explaining that our neighbour is a bar manager, hence she is living in the night, where we live by the day. She moved her TV to another wall, almost eliminating the noise, and invited us for a beer in her bar when the lockdown is over. I think this story could have unfolded in many ways, but I couldn’t have imagined a better way to get to know our bedroom neighbour. One resolution down.


Computer Club

The indisputable best computer game in human history is Civilization. Until May 28, you can download Civilization VI for free. Let me know if we should battle it out!


Reader Interviews

This week I’d like to connect you with Søren. Søren is the CEO of the Danish media startup Føljeton, but more importantly, he is one of the brightest minds and most understanding souls I’ve met. Søren is a vivid walker, curious reader, and supporter of wildflowers. Enjoy.

K: What would you be doing if given financial stability and three months of space?
Søren: Start walking south with a bag full of books. Or pitch a tent in a Swedish forest and find some great boulders to climb. If I had to do something productive, I would probably set up interviews with every single interesting editorial content creator and independent journalist I can think of.

K: What emotion is lost online?
Søren: I think most emotions can be conveyed or triggered online. But means of online transmission are just really low bandwidth compared to real life. The thousands of sensations and tiny cues we rely on when interacting with the physical world are reduced to simple streams of information. That’s one reason why people literally feel sick after a day of Zoom meetings. Being a stereotypical millennial, I prefer asynchronous communications but I really try to force myself to go high bandwidth. Switching from connection to conversation, in Sherry Turkle’s terms.

K: What question would you ask a tree?
Søren: Oh, I ask trees about things all the time. I even tried to befriend an ash tree on Assistens Kirkegård during Spring, spending a few hours with it per month. Still waiting for a reply on this one: Does history repeat itself?

K: What was one rabbit hole you recently fell into?
Søren: I’m a serial obsessive. This year, I’ve fallen into a bunch of rabbit holes: Regenerative farming, climbing documentaries, forest music, Earthsea. To name a few. Recently, I’ve been obsessed with David Dobrik and the Vloq Squad.

K: What would be your fictional dream job title?
Søren: Forester of ideas.

K: How do you think about time?
Søren: As a linear progression. Because that’s the basis of the culture I grew up in. But that can be a destructive way of thinking. Up until quite recently, humans probably thought of time as a cycle and not as a left to right upward slope of progress. I’ve been reading about the heathen wheel of the year and seasonal rituals recently and I think that a cyclical understanding of time would cure society (and myself) of many ills.
I think I have what is – tackily – called a growth mindset, meaning that I always try to become smarter and extract value from my time. Sometimes that’s fine, but it’s not wise to decouple growth from other parts of the life cycle: seeding, flowering, death, decay, rebirth.

K: How do you prepare for death?
Søren: Six months ago, I was hospitalized due to high blood pressure which kicked off a few months of severe anxiety about cardiovascular disease. Honestly, up until that point I probably didn’t even realize that death applied to me too. Now it’s clear as day.
I’ve been playing around with Yancey Strickler’s pop-philosophical Bento framework which is basically about forcing yourself to widen the scope of your values. Instead of only focusing on Now Me (“What do I want at this moment?”) when making decisions, he suggests that we also consider the needs of Now Us, Future Us and Future Me. The latter two categories are all about posterity. What kind of world do you want to leave behind? At the end of your life, what kind of person would you like yourself to have been? Whenever I make my weekly plans, I make sure to include some activities that serve those two categories.


Roadside Flowers

Delightful Surprises From The Information Superhighway

Build and nurture your own virtual ecosystem with Orb.farm. And head to r/jarrariums for real-world examples.

Simply the best YouTube video I have seen in a very long time, The Miracle Sudoku.

Donotdrawapenis.com. Make sure to read the about text.

Japan has their own Simone Giertz, she is called Marina Fujiwara and makes wonderful wasted machines like Spoiler Scanner, Get Out of Zoom, and Step on LEGO.


Internet Blackhole

  1. Yes, Websites Really Are Starting to Look More Similar
    If you ever have complained about how boring websites look today, this research study provides actual numbers to back your gut feeling. The researchers argue that the culprit is the shared code libraries everyone is using, adding a nice reminder that it is not all for the worse, for example the shared code libraries make it easier for people with disabilities to use the web.

  2. Doordash and Pizza Arbitrage
    ”If capitalism is driven by a search for profit, the food delivery business confuses the hell out of me,” if you are not hooked by now, this article about the absolute insanity of food delivery is not for you. If you are hooked, remember to read the comments too.

  3. Media, Regulators, and Big Tech
    I have to agree with Ben Thompson when it comes to whether Big Tech should be paying news organizations for showing snippets of their articles; it simply doesn’t make sense, and Thompson explains why.

  4. The Hot New Thing in Clubby Silicon Valley? An App Called Clubhouse
    Erin Griffith and Taylor Lorenz teamed up for this balanced introduction to the latest social network app to gain the attention of Silicon Valley investors.


Book Club

Since last update I finished Energy at the End of the World, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki, and Mothering Sunday. The latter wasn’t my taste, but the other two I can recommend. Energy at the End of the World is an impressive book written by ethnographer Laura Watts about energy futures being made at the Orkney Islands. If you are into Donna Haraway you’ll appreciate it, and if you work with innovation you ought to read it.

Murakami’s Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki became a natural extension of Flights, following the ‘colorless’ main character on his pilgrimage journey to discover what is in his empty container.


Naive Weekly

Hi, I’m Kristoffer and you have just read Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

Troels is one of the people I know who thinks the most about the meaning of life. This week he surprised me by becoming the eighteenth paying subscriber of this newsletter. Thank you very much Troels. I’m curious to see what path you’ll make.

Last week this newsletter was sent to 543 subscribers. Eighteen people are crazy enough to chip in every month/year to support me making time to write this newsletter: Nikolaj, DitteAntal, SørenDriesSarper, Thomas, Mikkel, Aydo, Lukas, Hans, Csongor, Dad, Ida Marie, Yinka, Stine, TroelsAngela!

Photograph by Ana Santl and you can still Buy My Notebook.

<3

Kristoffer

Empty Your Feed

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

When was the last time you had an empty calendar? When was the last time there was nothing inside you? When was the last time you traveled light into the unknown?

On the internet, you can’t visit my home. My home is not my profile picture, my home is not my about text, my home is not where I live, or where I was born. My home is my social feeds, carefully curated by algorithms, only visible for me.

It is easy to stay comfortable within my feeds. My feeds provide an endless scroll of updates from my friends and family. My feeds let me follow brands and people I admire. My feeds provide ideas for products to buy and experiences to try. My feeds help me stay updated on what is happening around me, and within the topics I am curious about.

My feeds are my personalized lunch boxes. They keep me fed, knowing just what kinda nutrition I am searching for at any given moment. My feeds might be endless, but they are already full. They are full of all the inspiration I’ve discovered over the past many years. They are full of the lives I lived, the jobs I had, the interests I lost, and the people I lost touch with.

Try to hit pause on your feeds, not to reduce screen time, but to surf the internet with an empty stomach. You can’t walk far if your bag is too heavy. So try to resist the urge to pick up every flower you pass and see where your curiosity takes you.


Roadside Flowers

Delightful Surprises From The Information Superhighway

Naive Weekly supporter, Yinka has added a beautiful online festival to the world. It is an open directory consisting of curated events within the topics related to this newsletter.

In this simulation, you are a NASA astronaut who has to dock onto the International Space Station. It is not easy.

Start measuring your own battery life.

MSCHF’s latest drop made waves in my internet bubble. Understandable. They are recreating every single episode of The Office in Slack.

Seven desert-themed short games you can play by all by yourself. The Joshua Tree is my favourite.


Internet Blackhole

Today I’m Reintroducing Bullets To Naive Weekly

  1. The New Scientology of Elon Musk
    I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve fanboyed Elon Musk in the past. The first time I became aware of the reality distortion field was the 2018 rescue of a group of boys caught in the caves of Thailand. Maybe instead of treating Elon Musk as a savour of society, we should treat him as the founder of a new religion? Strong post from 2018.

  2. Computers Do Not Make Art, People Do
    It is easy to be impressed with the state of software-generated art. However, Aaron Hertzmann argues that new technologies, whether oil on canvas, cameras, or artificial intelligence, do not make art, humans do. Rather straight to the point argumentation and easy to read.

  3. How Silicon Valley is Not Like Wall Street
    Don’t expect to read this post to regain belief in Silicon Valley. Over the last decades, the culture of money, power, and success has moved from East to West, but unlike Wall Street, Silicon Valley refuses to admit their power and responsibility.


Understory

Rich Nutrients For Your Passive Consumption

The editor of Real Life Mag, Rob Horning writes a weekly newsletter. It tends to be text-heavy, so likely not everyone’s cup of tea. However, I enjoy his light-edited takes on consumer culture, art history, and the online social space. If you prefer to read before signing up, please ping me and I can forward you a few samples.


Reader’s Club

Thanks for the positive feedback on the first Naive Weekly interview. I’ll continue the series in the coming month. And sorry for not having replied to everyone yet. I had what felt like a fast-forwarded backward week.


Naive Weekly

Hi, I’m Kristoffer and you have just read Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

Last week this newsletter was sent to 547 subscribers. Seventeen people are crazy enough to chip in every month/year to support me making time to write this newsletter: Nikolaj, DitteAntal, SørenDriesSarper, Thomas, Mikkel, Aydo, Lukas, Hans, Csongor, Dad, Ida Marie, Yinka, StineAngela!

Photograph by Ana Santl and you can still Buy My Notebook.

<3

Kristoffer

Silent Internet

This Is A Tribute To Silent Spring And How To Do Nothing

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

When was the last time you put your phone on silent? Have you already set a screentime limit? Do you sleep with flight mode on? Or maybe the phone in the other room? How many notifications have you muted? Have you blocked someone?

I am spending a significant amount of time thinking about how to protect myself from the noisy world of technology and the internet. I often feel bombarded online. I feel overwhelmed with information, notifications, and interactions. I believe this is one of the reasons why I’ve been searching back to my childhood memories of roaming the forest. The outside seems like an alternative reality, a silent retreat.

But if you expect silence when you take a walk in the forest or along the beach, then you’ll be immensely disappointed. If the wind blows, the trees will be shrieking, the waves roaring. If the wind is silent, you’ll be hearing birds whistling, and invisible animals moving. The outside is not silent, yet the noise rarely feels overwhelming. Rather it feels comforting.

And so I have been thinking this week, as Ana and I have been spending a few days outside of the city, that maybe I should not be so obsessed about making the internet and technology silent. Maybe I should rather just focus on finding better noise online.


Roadside Flowers

The State of the Information Highway

Emerson is 11 years old and only communicates with her friends and family using letters. Recently she wrote a letter to Doug, the local mailman, thanking him for his service. Doug shared it with his supervisor, and within days the story escalated beyond imagination.

Lumi Barron spent her quarantine training a squirrel to eat from a miniature tea set.

Write your own message using the newly launched InMemory font, made up of old-internet GIFs.

Relationship Reddit is the best Reddit. If you don’t have the patience for Reddit, this Twitter account is your shortcut.

Copy and paste in AR. It sounds simple — and looks even more simple as Cyril Diagne copy his office plant into photoshop.


Internet Blackhole

Keeping It Light This Week With Two Short Videos

I promise you, you’ll not guess the company behind this advertisement.

Isn’t it wonderful with a Boston Dynamics robot being deployed in Singapore to remind citizens of keeping distance?


Understory

Rich Nutrients For Your Passive Consumption

Everyone’s favourite technology couple, Holly Herndon and Mat Dryhurst just launched a podcast called The Interdependence. The first episode is a passionate criticism of neoliberalism and tech solutionism featuring Evgeny Morozov. Worth a listen, especially if you are interested in media, curation, and tech criticism.

I’m always impressed when I receive a newsletter from Future Crunch. Angus Hervey and Tane Hunter manage to cover science and technology without falling into blinded optimism or intellectual criticism.


Readers Club

I’ve been wanting to start an interview series for Naive Weekly for a very long time. Rather than talking with the usual suspect, I realized that I’m actually much more curious about all of you reading along. Many of you I already know, and therefore I know the wonderful worlds you breathe. I hope the interview series can become a way for your worlds to connect.

The very first interview is with Ana. Ana is my girlfriend and this week it was her birthday. Before I knew Ana, I fell in love with her photographs. Through her lens, she captures moments I’d rarely notice, and she does so, without reducing the richness of the life she documents. Her photos might be static, but each of them feels more like an invitation to write a story.

I’m very grateful to be sharing my days and life with Ana and to share her uncommon rhythm with you in this short interview. The very first Naive Weekly Interview.

Where do you go to get lost?

It’s not a place where I consciously go, but I always get lost when browsing my archives. It usually happens when I need to look for a specific file that I end up looking at photographs, digital or analog, from different times and places for hours.

How do you think about time?

My mind is usually stuck somewhere between the recent past and the present, rarely in the future. I often mentally replay scenarios and wonder how they could have developed differently, try to reconstruct spaces, and to remember how something felt and why there was a certain reaction to it. It is probably the reason why I feel a strong need to document things.

What would you be doing if given financial stability and three months space?

Visit my family and explore my home country, re-visit places that are especially dear to me, take photos of everyone I love, hug everyone I love, bake bread, collect and dry plants, send letters to the people I miss, paint sheets of paper with watercolours, cut them into shapes and arrange them, look at the water, listen to the waves.

What emotion is lost online?

I think emotions get easily lost in translation online. We might be using the same emoji palette, but how do I know that we interpret them the same way? Why is it that some of the words that I read bring me down until the author explains that they were only meant ironically? And how can I make sure that someone is not feeling quite indifferent when they type how funny they find the pigeon who stole the mayo that I just posted?


Naive Weekly

Hi, I’m Kristoffer and you have just read Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

My 17th paying subscriber became my dad. Thank you very much dad.

Last week this newsletter was sent to 546 subscribers. Seventeen people are crazy enough to chip in every month/year to support me making time to write this newsletter: Nikolaj, DitteAntal, SørenDriesSarper, Thomas, Mikkel, Aydo, Lukas, Hans, Csongor, Ida Marie, Yinka, StineAngela!

Photograph by Ana Santl and you can still Buy My Notebook.

<3

Kristoffer

Fear Hope Care

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Rants From The Son of a Preacher

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

The opposite of love is not hate, but indifference. It sounds like something you’d read on a fridge magnet or a Pinterest mood board. And probably it is, but that is not the point I want to make today.

These months I see many people promoting hope. For example, The Obama Foundation published Stories of Hope and David Byrne is back with a hopeful editorial on his positive news site, Reasons to be Cheerful.

It seems intuitive to be searching for hope in the face of uncertainty. To have a bright horizon to aim for in the midst of the darkness and turbulence of our everyday being ripped apart. Hope that can evaporate the fear of getting sick, losing our jobs, not being able to see our family, or having to say goodbye to loved ones.

But part of me can’t stop thinking about that fridge magnet wisdom about love. Just like the opposite of love is not hate, I don’t believe the opposite of fear is hope. Rather it is an abundance of generosity and care. Not in a promised future, but in the present now.


Internet Blackhole

The State of the Information Highway

One of the best journalism projects of 2019 was New York Times’ PrivacyProject. Now it turns out, that anyone who read this burning call for privacy accepted a dozen of cookies, including a 9-year persistent tracking cookie courtesy of Google. It is the same corporate b****** guidelines that cause Disney to automatically opt-in people for their corporate marketing if they use the Starwars Day hashtag on Twitter. I understand the system, but I wish there were some progressive leaders who’d stop this kinda madness.

In the early days of the coronavirus, I became a big fan of Carl T. Bergstorm, a biology professor at Washington University who did some first-class debunking on Twitter of all the misinformation being spread online about the virus. Digital minimalist, Cal Newport also seems to have relied on “Expert Twitter” for guidance in the viral information explosion, leading him to write an op-ed in Wired calling for us to Bring Back Blogs. Big liking from me. Ps. send me your favourite blogs. I’m all about RSS feeds these months.

The AI-generated music genre just got expanded with 7,131 songs released by Open AI. Each song is produced from scratch after having been provided with genre, artist, and lyrics as input. I like code-artist Kyle McDonald’s assessment “it feels like meeting an alien trying to decipher music”. A couple of machine learning experts at Google have some valid ethical questions about the project.


Roadside Flowers

Delightful Surprises From The Information Superhighway

Not the first of its type, but still an extremely well-executed scale showing you the wealth of the super rich. No single human needs or deserves this much wealth.

Ana and I had some fun this week turning selfies into anime.

Internet LOL-director, Pablo Rochat brings a smile to your face if you follow him on Twitter (and have the same bad sense of humour as me). Above is fashion.zip.

Improve your iMessage replies with this free sticker package.

Neal Agarwal is back with a new online creation, this one is next-level strategic foresight, showing us the future of the universe. If the life of the universe was a year, you're living in the first millisecond of January 1st. Enjoy…

I started doing visual research for a project called Wildflowers.club that I’m working on with Søren. It is the first time I use Are.na intentionally, but now I don’t understand how I could live without before. Single best research tool I have ever used. Follow us foraging visual inputs for Wildflowers.club, and get started with Are.na.


Book Club

Although Ana and I just finished the career mode of Rollercoaster Tycoon 3 (I had to mention this), I am still manage to read a bit. This week I finished Flights by Olga Tokarczuk and Abolish Silicon Valley by Wendy Liu. The latter is an easy to read story of a young developer, turned startup founder, turned capitalism critique. When Abolish Silicon Valley works best, it reads as a critical version of HBO’s Silicon Valley show.

Meanwhile, Flights was an extraordinary experience. It is a collection of 160 short stories and one impressive example of non-linear storytelling. When it is best, it is some of the best I have ever read, with a solid substance of philosophy, and reflection of life in motion.


Naive Weekly

Hi, I’m Kristoffer and you have just read Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

Ditte! Thank you so much for upgrading to a paid subscriber. You are already a master facilitator, and maybe just therefore I know you’ll like this Are.na channel on Facilitation & Conversation.

And another big thank you to everyone who Bought My Notebook. It took 11 minutes from I sent the newsletter to Mikkel had purchased the physical version. It gave this week an incredible feeling of generosity. Thank you.

Last week this newsletter was sent to 537 subscribers. Sixteen people are crazy enough to chip in every month/year to support me making time to write this newsletter: Nikolaj, DitteAntal, SørenDriesSarper, Thomas, Mikkel, Aydo, Lukas, Hans, Csongor, Ida Marie, Yinka, StineAngela!

Photograph by Ana Santl.

<3

Kristoffer

Buy My Notebook

I Bought Another Domain So I Can Sell You My Notebook

Another Sunday, Another Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

The objects I’d be the saddest losing are my notebooks. The panic some people describe when worried that they might have lost their phone, this is the panic I feel whenever I for a short moment think I have lost one of my notebooks.

I rarely leave the door without a notebook and I never read a book without a notebook by my side. Whether in my bag, pocket, or in my hand, I’d usually always carry a notebook with me.

The first notebook I started to use religiously was a black hardcover Moleskine A5 with blank pages. I obsessed over that notebook like Patrick Bateman obsesses over business cards in American Psycho. For many years it would be the only notebook I’d ever consider to touch.

I bought my first Moleskine at Copenhagen Airport. I’d arrived early for my flight and my stomach was filled with butterflies. Ahead of me was six weeks of traveling, alone. It was the first time I was traveling for more than a couple of weeks and it was the first time I was traveling alone.

During this trip, the notebook became my tool for calming myself down. It became the medium for grasping what I experienced. It became where I’d develop my own pocket philosophies, random sketches, and things I had to remember.

Today I swear to Muji’s blank A6 notebook. It is much smaller than the Moleskine I started out using, but the importance and use of the notebook are the same. It is the most direct mirror into what I am feeling, thinking, and fearing.

As an experiment, I decided to make one notebook consisting of notes from the past two years notebooks. I kinda like how it turned out, so I also made a digital version. If you like this newsletter, I think you might like the notebook too.

You can buy the notebook on my new domain, www.buymynotebook.com, for real! The digital version cost €5 and the physical notebook cost €25. Please be aware that there is only one copy of the physical notebook.

Buy My Notebook


Internet Blackhole

Articles That Made Me Think Twice

Infrastructures only become visible when it breaks down. These days the global logistics system is breaking down, showing us the end of supply chain capitalism. Media historian and supply chain oracle, Matthew Hockenberry asks why do we want to refuge these just-in-time chains?

If consumers finally were sick of consuming, maybe let them be so and don’t try to repackage your product as community or experience. Citizens in today’s western liberal democracies are the loneliest people ever recorded. I don’t believe the solution is for another meaningless company to design another meaningless community. Maybe the loneliness epidemic is not a problem of disconnection but in our inability to experience each other’s company on non-transactional terms. </rant>


Roadside Flowers

Delightful Surprises From The Information Superhighway

I love the simplicity of Outside.Report. People from across the world live broadcast the view out of their window. The instructions deserve applause too:

  1. Get a phone.
    Place it on a window facing the real world and connect it to a charger

  2. Install the YouTube app.
    Set up a live transmission and send us the link

  3. Stay the fuck home.

Like the wire walker, the world is constantly in motion. These days, the changes just seem to happen faster and in ways, we’d conceive as naive, dystopian, or unimaginable only a few weeks ago. The New Possible is a well-curated collection of progressive initiatives happening around the globe.

AI-generated profile pictures where you can sort by different parameters including ethnicity and age.

Arduino co-founder David Cuartielles once tried to get me to hire him as The Contrarian. The person in the room who would always take the opposite perspective. Neither of us did anything with the excellent idea, so I was extremely happy when I saw Special Guest launching this week. It looks better than anything I could ever create and the characters for hire are much more thought through!

The Human Timer - Does Gary always talk too much? Are you curious about what the quieter people have to say? Upon request, the Human Timer will use actual timers to enforce equal speaking time for all.

The Bard - Are your meetings full of brave agenda items and wise words? The Bard will compose a short song celebrating your meeting, during the meeting.

Internet nostalgia is still going strong in 2020. Here is a retro-themed template for your personal website and here is a Windows 98 design library. Both are free, just like the web used to be.

I’m a fan of how much it is possible to create without any code. There are quite a few #NoCode courses and websites, but Automate All The Things is the prettiest I have seen so far.

Seinfeld fans are creating a Seinfeld Game.

My friend Xavier made this easy to use and privacy-respecting tool to create Open Letters.


Understory

Rich Nutrients For Your Passive Consumption

Tuesday I ended up spending an afternoon appreciating the scope and quality of the interviews on The Creative Independent. Published by Kickstarter, it covers everything related to creative practices and their people database is one of the best you’ll find online.


Naive Weekly

Hi, I’m Kristoffer and you have just read Naive Weekly - Observations From The Internet Wilderness.

Sarper and Thomas, thank you very very much. It is hard to believe that I crossed the magic number of a new paying subscriber three weeks in a row. Here is a personal message, just for you.

Last week this newsletter was sent to 542 subscribers. Fifteen people are crazy enough to chip in every month/year to support me making time to write this newsletter: Nikolaj, Antal, SørenDriesSarper, Thomas, Mikkel, Aydo, Lukas, Hans, Csongor, Ida Marie, Yinka, StineAngela!

Photograph by Ana Santl.

<3

Kristoffer

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